Saturday, March 18, 2017

Saint Patrick's Day - What the Irish Get Up To and What They Don't

It's the day after St. Patrick's Day and over the course of the last 24 hours I've been scanning how people around the world (particularly in the United States) celebrate the day.

It still quite amazes me that a country the size of Ireland has managed to influence the world to Go Green once a year. It's sort of baffling, actually. I mean: the world doesn't have a day devoted to Italy once a year, does it? We don't all tank up on Spaghetti and pitchers full of Chianti and raise a glass to some Italian saint none of us have heard of, do we?

The world doesn't celebrate George Washington Day once a year nor toast the good health of King Richard III or become teary-eyed when reminiscing the French Saint Albaud of Toul. Nor do governments insist on the once a year display of their favourite monuments in garish yellow lights to commemorate a complete foreigner. As I say, the global breadth of Saint Patrick on March 17 every year still baffles me. It is unique and therefore somehow thrilling.

But...what I find even more baffling are the various ways some of my American friends and acquaintances celebrate the day. Based on what they say, they truly believe their celebratory adventures are in keeping with the traditions of Ireland. And while I don't mean to burst anyone's bubble many of these practices are completely foreign to the Irish.

So I thought a short list was in order: things that most Irish simply will not do on Saint Patrick's Day...and what they actually get up to.

What Most Irish Will Not Do on St. Patrick's Day


  1. It is St. Patrick's Day, not Patty's Day - oh how many times have I heard folks name the day after a Patricia I've never heard of? It's PATRICK'S Day. Not Paddy's Day or Patty's Day or anything in between.
  2. Drink Green Beer - which is an absolute sacrilege. Most beer drunk in Ireland on this day of days is black. It's called Guinness. Drinking green beer is heretical. The Irish have died for less.
  3. Drink Beer in Pitchers - pitchers do not exist in Ireland. Beer comes in pint glasses. It also comes in 'a glass' - that is, when you want a 1/2 pint of beer over here, you order a Glass of beer. Good beer also comes in tins (cans) but it is drunk that way in the summer months only and out in the back garden. On St Patrick's Day, beer is drunk by the pint and nothing less will quite do.
  4. Eat Anything Unnaturally Green - in Ireland on St Patrick's Day we are not allowed to buy and eat Green Bagels. We don't eat: green potatoes, green biscuits (cookies), or green ice cream (other than Mint which is perfectly acceptable). The Irish do eat green cabbage but that's because it comes that way.
  5. Dye Rivers Green - on St Patrick's Day the Irish do not Dye the Shannon River green. Nor the Liffey River, though  the Liffey often looks green anyway. Nor any other inland waterway. If it's not naturally green - if a body of water is pink for instance - it's just going to have to stay that way over the Patrick's Day week.
  6. Dye Bits and Pieces of Their Bodies Green - though some here may embrace this practice, most don't. Hair or other body parts are not dyed green. Period.
  7. Eat Corned Beef and Cabbage for Dinner - in all my years here I don't think I've ever heard of an Irish person eating Corned Beef for dinner. On St Patrick's Day, many will have Bacon and Cabbage, but do not confuse 'Bacon' with fried bacon strips which many Americans  have for breakfast. Here, Bacon is a cut of pork, a fine lump of meat much like ham. Boil it up for hours, serve with boiled cabbage and boiled spuds, and voila! But on St Patrick's Day the Irish may also eat: duck, beef, Chinese Take-Away, lamb and many other items. Ideally, these are all washed down with vast quantities of Guinness.
  8. Dress Their Children Up Like Leprechauns - here we don't need to dress our kids up like wee little people. Leprechauns can be found in glens and forests. We prefer the real kind and don't want to mislead our children into thinking they can spin beer into pots of Gold.
What Most Irish Do on St. Patrick's Day

  1. Go to Mass - it's a Saint's Day, right? It's our day of national celebration, also correct? Which means many of us go to a Mass of thanksgiving on this day. Particularly because in Ireland it's a holy day of obligation and we'll be damned for all time if we don't go.
  2. Drown the Shamrock - many Irish give up the dreaded drink for the 40 days of Lent. But: Lent ends only at Easter. On the 17 of March, Easter is still weeks away which means technically those of us who have promised to abstain still should. But - we have a secret weapon. On St Patrick's Day the Irish embrace an unauthorised day of absolution. Which means Lent or no Lent, many will drink like fishes.
  3. Attend the Parade - on St. Patrick's Day, it seems every little town and village has their very own St Patrick's Day Parade. These are small, often rural, affairs. Parades are often created from: tractors, ambulances, the local Garda Siochana, children dressed in all sorts of bright attire, local school bands whether they can play or not, the local landed gentry riding large horses, and the drunken rabble who pour out of local pubs to watch. Invariably it rains on St Patrick's Day which means we all clutch hot whiskey's in our mits while trying not to look miserable.
  4. Wear Shamrock - shamrock is real. It's a wee little 3-leafed plant that is absolutely glorious. Only 2 days ago, our great Taoiseach (Prime Minister) gave a bowl of this magical stuff to the current President of the United States who apparently didn't understand the significance of it all and possibly tossed it down the toilet. The Irish don't get bowls of Shamrock. Instead, we pick it and pin it to our clothing. Within an hour or two the greenery dries up and dies but it is wonderful while it lasts. 
  5. Go  to the Local Pub - related to Drowning the Shamrock (above), going to the Local is a tried and tested tradition. What's more: all are welcome. Whole families show up including crying children, bored teenagers, and parents intent on enjoying themselves despite the wails of their infants. Going to the Local Pub is obligatory on St Patrick's Day.
  6. Go Back to the Local Pub - I should explain that many make an initial trip to the Local following Mass or the Parade, with families in tow. After that, most retire home for dinner (see comments on Bacon and Cabbage above). After that, and perhaps after an hour's nap if one is so lucky, some sneak back out to enjoy themselves at the Local until the wee hours.
  7. Sing and Dance - if you're lucky, your Local will also have brought in a Traditional Group. Often consisting of a fiddler, Bodhran player, pipes if you're fortunate, accordion or squeeze box player, a fellow on guitar, and a man or woman with a lusty voice, drunken local folk will sing along until the band stops playing - or even longer than that. 
And there you have it. What's done and not done in Ireland on our National Saint's Day. Which means, if you're living elsewhere and want to practice a traditional Irish St Patrick's Day in future, all you need to do is:
  • Go to Mass even if you're not Catholic
  • Attend a Parade even if you have to go to the other side of the country to find one
  • Eat Bacon and Cabbage, not Corned Beef and Cabbage
  • Refuse to eat anything unnaturally green
  • Find your local pub and stay there
  • Sing and dance until you're simply not able to anymore
Or - climb on a plane and come here to experience a real Irish St Patrick's Day yourself. Happy St Patrick's Day everyone - even if it's a day late.

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom

Monday, February 27, 2017

Educating Your Children in Ireland

If you're considering a move to Ireland and have school-age children, your concerned thoughts may turn to a single, critical question: Will my children benefit from an education in this country?

As a father of three (now grown) children, and a grandfather of five (not so grown) grandchildren, this same thought passed across my furrowed brow oh-so-many years ago. As an American, I was educated for the most part in the United States. Back in the mid-80s and having established residency here - and as my kids reached those formative school-going years -  I too worried for their future. After all, to my Yankee ears even the Irish educational nomenclature sounded decidedly foreign.

Primary school, secondary school, transition year, third level...what did it all mean? And though  I was (and still am) Catholic, the realisation that many schools were run by the Catholic Church gave me a moment's pause for reflection. While I attended Catholic schools for a few years in years gone by, did I want my kids taught by an Irish Catholic Church which was beset with many woes? I was so worried that for awhile I considered abandoning Ireland all together and moving back to the United States.

I shouldn't have let my over-active imagination cause me worry. And neither should you. Because over the years I've discovered that Ireland offers one of the best educations around. To all of her people.

A Background

Primary School: Most kids here start school at about the age of 4 or 5. The first two years, Junior and Senior Infants, are sort of like the U.S. version of Kindergarten and prepare children for the balance of their education. Following that, children attend 6 years of Primary School.

Most primary schools are State run. Many are still administered by the Catholic Church. Other than reading, writing, 'rithmatic, and other foundation courses, the syllabus includes Catholic religion classes and important (to Catholics anyway) milestones such as First Communion and Confirmation.

However, if you are not Catholic your child is not required to take religion classes so rest easy.

That said, as more and more immigrants wash up on these shores, schools incorporating other religions, or multi-disciplinary religious theologies, or none at all, are also being developed. Too, many parents choose to send their children to schools run by the Church of Ireland.

Unless attending a private school, Primary Schools in Ireland are free (that said, parents are often asked to make contributions to schools to help them cope with ongoing expenses or new investments).

For more information on Ireland's Primary Schools please click here.

Secondary School: the Secondary School cycle typically accommodates kids from the ages of 12 and up and is 5 or 6 years long. Many schools offer the option of a 'Transition Year' (following the 3rd year  of secondary school) which is a sort of practical year enabling students to explore varied areas of interest outside of the typical curriculum. Most kids love Transition Year (though some profess to hate it.)

Once again, many Secondary Schools are State owned and run by the Church. However, others are private and run by other religions and organisations. Some parents also send their children to Boarding Schools. Many of these tend to be both prestigious and expensive. My kids all attended public Secondary Schools. They're free and offer a great education.

Note that some Secondary Schools are open only to boys. Some only to girls. While others are mixed. So take your pick, depending on what is on offer in your area.

Critical Irish Secondary School Exams: now here's where it gets very different from the United States. For many Americans, going to High School is a leap toward a college education. Entrance to the college or university of our choice is often based on a combination of results including High School GPA, standardised testing like the ACT and SAT, and often the quality of our application.

Here it differs completely.

Kids in Secondary School sit two major examinations. The first is the Junior Certificate. This tough examination usually takes place during a pupil's 3rd year of Secondary School. It is a multi-day series of tests across anywhere between 9 and 13 subjects.

The Junior Cert is a comprehensive examination which tests the skills and learning kids have received during their first 3 years of Secondary School. But does the Junior Cert have anything to do with College entrance? Not on your life. Instead, kids sit yet another exam. A more important exam. The nightmare of all exams:

The Leaving Cert: here's where the tough get going. The Leaving Cert is taken at the end of the last year of Secondary School. Kids spend almost a year preparing for it. Entire households go on prescription sedatives during this period because...

The Leaving Cert results, and only those results, determine not only where you can go to college or university, but if you can go at all. If your Leaving Cert results (the number of points you've obtained) aren't up to scratch, you simply can't compete in a country loaded with kids desiring a college and university education. Those with poor Leaving Cert results have options, of course. They can wait a year and take the Exam all over again. Or they can go on to a trade school or apply to foreign colleges and universities.

But make no bones about it: unlike the U.S., the single week of the Leaving Cert exam can determine the future for most students. And that is a daunting task, if I've ever heard of one.

Click here for more information on Irish Secondary Schools.

Higher Education

In my opinion, and for its size, Ireland has some of the best colleges and universities around. These so-called '3rd Level' institutions offer a breadth of education and learning required for today's highly competitive marketplace. From business degrees to Medicine; arts diplomas to computer science; practical degrees in construction to theology, Ireland has it all.

What's more, compared to equivalent U.S. university education, Ireland's institutions cost a pittance. If you are an Irish citizen or legally residing in Ireland, fees for most universities (including Trinity, UCD, DCU, University College Ireland, and many others) are €3,000 per year. I'll write it again:

€3,000 per year!

Okay, you'll have to add other costs to that: books and computers, living quarters and subsistence, but what a bargain! And trust me: the quality of education in this country does not reflect that bargain basement price. Instead, and depending on what you want to do and where you go, it's some of the best around. Just ask my son who recently graduated from NUI Maynooth with a PhD in the Irish language. He's more than a little pleased.

The Bottom Line

I was right to stay in Ireland if for nothing else than the quality of education which has substantially benefited my children. Okay, many Secondary Schools may not have the state-of-the-art infrastructure some U.S. High Schools have: most don't have an indoor swimming pool or indoor track or huge stage.

But they have something else: a high quality education delivered by teachers and teaching professionals who still consider their profession to be one of the best around. In return, most Irish respect those teachers, knowing that their diligence and skills provide a pathway to a future for their children.

If you're considering a move to Ireland I hope you take my advice: don't worry about your children's education. Ireland, I think, has some of the best in the world.

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom

Saturday, January 21, 2017

Meeting the Demand for IT Jobs

Most weeks I receive a question or two from people looking to come to Ireland hoping to study, work, and live. I thought I'd post my response here hoping other folks might find it of benefit.

The questions, received this morning, are:


 
Hi,

I am planning to take masters in ireland. I got an offer from NCI in MS cloud computing. I have also applied to Univ of cork and Trinity, waiting for them to revert with a confirmation.

Sir can you please share me the Job market in IT sector ? competition will be high ?
Even if I land up in a job in IT sector , will I be able to get a PR.

Awaiting for your response.

The Answers:
 First - congratulations to this person on your offer from NCI (National College of Ireland). It's a great school and I surely hope you'll enjoy the experience. And I must say I wish you luck with the University of Cork and Trinity. You might look at CIT (Cork Institute of Technology) which also has a fine IT programme.

Too, your choice of studying for an MS in cloud computing seems to me to be spot on. So many companies are hiring in this area. After all, cloud computing is a burgeoning area of growth, and companies simply cannot find enough qualified people to keep up with their requirements.

With regards to your questions: "Can you please share with me the job market in the IT sector in Ireland?  Answer: do a simple Google trawl. This morning I used only one key phrases: IT CLOUD COMPUTING JOBS IN IRELAND. Google came back to me with any number of pages. Here's just one: http://www.irishjobs.ie/Cloud-Computing-Jobs. Take a look and you'll see a good few opportunities on this page alone. Take a look at the other links and you'll find any number of great prospects.

You ask if competition will be high? The answer is Yes, of course it will. But not for the reasons you might expect. Right now there is a shortage of skilled IT personnel in Ireland. Companies seem to be falling all over themselves to attract the right people. But the key phrase here is: "The right people." They're looking for smart, motivated, hard-working folks who will bring needed skills to fill a resource gap. And I'm certain that if you study hard and connect with people and companies during your studies, you'll do just fine.

Finally you ask about Permanent Residency. That's tougher but not impossible. I suggest you go to a previous post I've written to answer this question. Go to: http://survivingireland.blogspot.ie/2016/11/getting-job-and-living-in-ireland-trump.html for more information. Too, when you start your studies Career Guidance people at your college or university will be able to help.

Wishing you so much luck!

Tom

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom




Thursday, January 19, 2017

Brexit Slams Irish Food and Drink Exports to the Tune of €570 million in Lost Potential Sales

Ireland is caught in an economic vice. Brexit hasn't even happened yet and already the Irish economy is feeling the bitter winds inbound from just over the Irish Sea.

A few days ago, Bord Bia - that wonderful state agency responsible for monitoring Ireland's food and drink industry - reported that the fall in the value of Sterling has already wiped out €570 million in potential exports within this industry. That's a hell-of-a-lot of euro. (see RTE reporter George Lee's article on additional downsides due to Brexit). What's shiveringly possible is: the spectre of Brexit could result in yet another wave of unemployment sweeping into this country.

The impact of Brexit is difficult to fully predict. We do not yet know if the United Kingdom will push tariffs on a variety of products down our throats. If they do prices of Irish exports into the UK will skyrocket, further dampening the suddenly fragile Irish economic recovery. The government is taking some action by pro-actively consulting with Irish exporters. Many companies here depend largely on UK exports to make a profit and survive. The Irish government is suggesting it's time to diversify to other nations in order to mitigate risk. However, gearing up to serve the needs of other countries can be a relatively long process. In the meantime, those employed by Irish companies who are dependent on Britain as a key export market are going to have to take a huge breath and cross their fingers, hoping they'll be able to keep their jobs as the ramification of Brexit becomes clearer.

Job Opportunities Due to Brexit

But all is not lost. Ireland is still hiring big-time within key industries. It turns out that Brexit may have a silver lining after all. Many UK-based companies, fearing a loss of free-trade movement throughout the EU, are considering a relocation to Ireland. For that reason, legal, accounting, and professional services could see a significant rise in employment opportunities.

Other industries are also gearing  up despite - or because - of Brexit. Folks with skills in digital marketing, engineers of all types, pharmaceutical specialists, guys and gals with experience in global sales and marketing, IT, nurses and doctors, people with construction experience - all are still in great demand.

So much so that many companies are recruiting Irish citizens who left this country to immigrate abroad during the bad years in order to survive. Today, businesses are reaching out to the great Irish diaspora, hoping to lure many of these people back home to fill their skills shortages.

So yes. The impact from Brexit will certainly shake Ireland's economy and the job prospects that go with a recovery. But - the uncertainly of Brexit could also deliver more opportunities to this country.

For more information take a look at a December article by The Irish Examiner. A thoughtful - and hope-filled - piece.

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom



Thank You for 105K+ Visits

When I started this blog in 2009, and if I'm honest, I did so for a fairly simple reason. Since moving to Ireland in 1982 many of my (mostly) American friends kept asking me the same questions over and over again:

"Why in God's name did you ever move to Ireland? You must have been mad!"

"Can I move to Ireland too? Like, I mean, it's simple, right?"

"How can I get a job in Ireland? I'm sure all I have to do is show up, don't I?"

"Ireland must be so quaint! Do people still use donkey carts to get around?"

The simplicity (and complete lack of knowledge) behind some of these questions could only make me smile. Anyway, I got tired of answering the same questions and in a moment of knee-jerk response started this blog. The results have been beyond my wildest dreams.

This morning, the statistical tools of this simple humble blog hit 105,000 unique visits. That's a heck of a lot a visitors and I'm glad you didn't show up at my small house in Eyeries all at once. I'm certain I would have run out of tea, coffee, beer, and anything else I can think of.

So thank you. Thank you for visiting. Thank you for your support. And as always: if I can answer a question let me know. I'll get back to you and do my best to point you in the right direction.

With my very best regards to all of you,

Tom
Eyeries, Beara, County Cork Ireland

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom

Saturday, December 31, 2016

In 2017, Why Not Visit Us in Eyeries? We'd Love It

I don't think I've ever mentioned it but here where we live, in the small village of Eyeries, way out on the Beara Peninsula in Southwest Ireland (just about as far southwest as you can get), we run a small tent camping operation. And when I say small, I mean small.

Each summer we turn the back garden into a campground. Visitors from all parts of the world make their way here mostly by foot, bicycle and even kayak (yes, we've had visitors come to us that way). God knows how they hear about us or learn that we even exist. We don't advertise nor do we want to. Most see the small sign which hangs on the front of the house. These poor souls, usually exhausted by their staunch efforts of journeying to Eyeries, often set up tents in the backyard, then stagger the few feet up the hill to Causkey's, our local pub, for much needed refreshment.

Not many stay with us. And frankly that suits us just fine. That way we can spend real time getting to know the people who live in our garden if only for a night or two, and along the way we've made so many friends - guys and gals travelling on their own from Holland or Germany. Couples hiking the Beara Way along the coast who came from South Africa and made it over the rugged hills between us and the coastal village of Allihies further down the peninsula. The older couple from New Zealand who stayed with us for two nights, went on their way, then came back to us a few nights later because they missed it so much.

We've had families from Dublin and painters from France. College students taking a break from their studies in Spain, and retired people visiting from England. We've had Americans, Canadians, Egyptians, folks from Israel, Scouts from Switzerland, a bunch of German lads who sent us bottles of Pilsner when they returned home to thank us, and even a family from the Isle of Man who unfortunately did not bring along their Manx cat. All are people with good hearts and good tales of their travels, and each one has provided us with a memory we cherish.

People like Johan (pictured above), a Dutch traveller on a bicycle who landed in Dublin and made his way down, down, down into the Southwest to finally land on our doorstep to spend some time with us. Fully rested, he continued his tour around Ireland. His trip was obviously rewarding. Only today, on this final day of 2016, he sent us a video of his travels.

What a trip! And if you want to see what you could be enjoying on a visit such as Johan's' simply view his YouTube slide show by clicking here.

Sometimes I forget how fortunate we are to live in Eyeries. The people who visit with us constantly remind me of the natural glories which surround us: The startling views of nearby Coulagh Bay in the first light of dawn. The shrill voices of gulls crying as they circle overhead, gliding on the soft winds without effort. The curtained gales which march in from the west, blasting the village in a ferocious frenzy.

Then the sunset, and a glory rarely beheld. Only to be bettered by the darkness of the night. The sky bejewelled in a million glittering pin drops of starlight. The Milky Way a gossamer curtain painted with a telling brush across the firmament. Sometimes, standing in that quiet, I truly believe I can reach up  through the night sky and touch the face of God.

That's what it's like, living here in Eyeries. We don't have to travel far to be one with nature. Instead, we live in it. I guess that's what people remember when they visit us. They remember the humbling views of the Bay and the soft evening song as birds fall asleep. They remember, I think, the starkness of the white cumulus clouds rolling overhead. They also remember the people of this small village nestled between rocky hills and a vast ocean. And for a moment I like to think that we can all simply breath.

Thank you for visiting us, Johan. Thank you everyone who has visited with us and stayed in our small back garden. We hope your travels here have given you peace. Certainly, you all have given us memories to treasure.

I hope many more will visit us in 2017 and for years to come. Tom :)    For more information on Eyeries by all means go to www.eyeries.ie.http://www.eyeries.ie

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom




Friday, December 30, 2016

2017 Edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland now available!

2017 EBOOK KINDLE EDITION NOW AVAILABLE! 

A Survivor’s Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards gives you the insight you need  to move, work, and visit Ireland. 

Come for a week – stay for a lifetime! That’s the lure of Ireland. Essential reading for anyone considering a move or visit to Ireland. 6th edition! Over 14,000 copies already sold! 

How will Brexit and Trump’s presidential policies affect your plans to move and work in Ireland? Are you entitled to an Irish Work Visa? If so how can you get one? Is Ireland the land of your dreams? Have you ever thought of staying for a prolonged visit, establishing residency, or creating an Irish business? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live in Ireland? Find out in this rich volume of almost 90,000 words devoted to the ever-changing tapestry of living and working in Ireland. This fun, easy to read book contains (among other things) a brief history of Ireland, the opportunities present here for would-be immigrants, and tips on how to get a work permit, become a citizen, buy a home, cope with taxation and the cost of living, and enjoy this amazing country for yourself. As an added bonus, a Dictionary of Irish Slang and Phrases is also included! 

In 1982, American Tom Richards, fresh out of UCLA, took a four-week holiday in Ireland. He’s been here ever since. Witty and insightful, Tom tells how he overcame the culture shock of living in the Ol’ Sod, learning to twist his middle-class American thinking into a more European point of view while managing to pay his bills at the same time. Along the way, he’s learned some practical lessons that he now shares: From how to understand the Irish to how to drink a perfect pint; from finding a job to how to get a work permit; from purchasing your fist dream home to learning to take soaking walks on a soft Irish day. 

Here, he reveals that to survive in Ireland all you have to do is discover the magic of this wonderful country for yourself. A Survivor’s Guide to Living in Ireland has already sold over 14,000 copies. With it you can learn to Talk like the Irish, Drink like the Irish, Work like the Irish, and Live like the Irish. Essential reading for anyone considering a visit or move to this fabulous country.

A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Kindle Edition Now Available!

If this blog interests you and you want to learn more about Ireland why not consider purchasing A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland 2017 Edition. Are you thinking about living and working in Ireland? Would you like to move to Ireland? Do you want to know how to get an Irish work visa in this country? Do you need to know how Brexit and Trump policies may affect your plans? If so, consider purchasing the 2017 edition of A Survivor's Guide to Living in Ireland by Tom Richards. Now almost 90,000 words long, this book could make the perfect gift for  those interested in this wonderful country. Over 14,000 people have now learned how to live, laugh, and drink like the Irish by reading this Kindle ebook. I hope you enjoy, and my very best - Tom